Who has to have counselling in WA?

In WA consumers undergoing IVF are entitled to one counselling session per treatment cycle and one session when deciding to end treatment, with an Approved Counsellor.

In cases of known donation, counselling is required for all participants with an Approved Counsellor. (See Use of Known Donors below).

Within the provisions of the RTAC Code of Practice (which WA clinics must comply with) "counselling by specialist infertility counsellors is mandatory for people donating or using stored gametes or embryos".

Where disclosure/sharing of identifying information about donation is being considered counselling approved by the Commissioner of Health will be required.

- Return to top of this page


What information is available on the Reproductive Technology Register?

The WA Department of Health keeps a register of all ART treatments carried out in Western Australia known as the Reproductive Technology Register. Access to this information is in keeping with the Human Reproductive Technology Act's requirements and will depend on what information is sought and who by. For further information concerning donor related information please refer to Donor Rights and Responsibilities.

- Return to top of this page


What is the Voluntary Register?

The Voluntary Register is a register, which maintains a record of the wishes about information sharing for people involved in the donation and receipt of human reproductive material (such a sperm, eggs and embryos). Further information is available on the web site of the Voluntary Register.

- Return to top of this page


When does the cooling off period for psycho-social preparation/counselling in cases of known donation commence?

The cooling off period is to commence after there has been counselling of both the recipients and the donors jointly and separately including their respective spouses/partners. The time of commencement of the cooling off period is the initial counselling session between the donor and the recipients.

- Return to top of this page


How long is the cooling off period for psycho-social preparation/counselling in cases of known donation?

The Directions under the Human Reproductive Technology Act 1991 state that a cooling off period for psycho-social preparation/counseling must follow the completion of the initial counselling session in cases of known donation. The cooling off period for both egg and embryo donation is three (3) months followed by the quarantine period of 180 days. Therefore recipients of donor eggs or embryos are required to wait nine (9) months before proceeding with treatment using the donated eggs or embryos.

The cooling off period for sperm donation is six (6) months. This period generally coincides with the 180 days quarantine period required for donated sperm. In cases where the donor sperm has already been quarantined for six (6) months, the cooling off period is reduced to 3 months. Generally recipients of donor sperm are required to wait six (6) months before proceeding with treatment. (See NOTICES on Information for Clinics page).

- Return to top of this page


Can single women or women in same sex relationships access Donor Insemination?

Single women, lesbian couples and couples with male factor infertility issues can use donor sperm and access artificial insemination to attempt to achieve a pregnancy, under the direction of a licensee.

- Return to top of this page


Can single women or women in same sex relationships access IVF?

If you are a fertile single woman, or a fertile woman in a same sex or heterosexual relationship, you are not eligible to access in vitro fertilisation procedures. IVF is accessible in cases where a woman or a couple is unable to conceive due to medical reasons or where a couple or a woman’s child is likely to be affected by a genetic abnormality or a disease.

- Return to top of this page


Can I access identifying information about the donor on behalf of my child who is under 16?

Parents who have used donated human reproductive material to form their families may consent on behalf of their minor children for sharing of identifying information about the donor and recipients where both parties request this. This is to follow counselling (approved by the Commissioner of Health on advice from the RTC) to address, in particular, what may be in the best interests of the child.

- Return to top of this page


Is the Exporting and Importing of Sperm permitted in WA?

Click here for further information.

- Return to top of this page


Semen (Sperm) Storage

Some men may require the facility for storing sperm due to medical reasons or other personal reasons. There are five sperm banks in WA. Click here for further information.

- Return to top of this page


Can sperm be used after the death of the sperm provider?

Where the sperm provider is known to be dead the sperm cannot be used whether donated anonymously or for use by the wife (partner). This is the case even if the sperm provider has given explicit consent prior to their death. The reasons are related to concerns for the interests of children being conceived after the death of the father.

- Return to top of this page


What is Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD)?

Click here for further information about PGD

- Return to top of this page


Is Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) available in WA?

Preimplantation genetic testing of embryos may be carried out for people who are eligible to undergo IVF in WA. This includes people who are unable to conceive a child due to medical reasons (infertile) or whose children may be affected by a genetic abnormality or disease. Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis and Screening (PGD and PGS) may be sought where there is a significant risk of a serious genetic abnormality or disease being present in the embryo.

Several clinics in WA offer these services: currently Concept Fertility Centre, Hollywood Fertility Centre, Fertility Specialists of Western Australia and PIVET Medical Centre offer services for PGD and PGS. Council approval is required on a case by case basis before a clinic can undertake the testing of embryos. Sex selection, other than to avoid transmission of a serious sex-linked condition, is not permitted in WA.

- Return to top of this page


Is surrogacy allowed in WA?

Laws allowing surrogacy in Western Australia were passed in December 2008. Click here for more information.

- Return to top of this page

 

Blastocyst Intra Cytoplasmic Sperm Injection (ICSI) 4 Cell Embryo (3 cells are visible) Blastocyst Oocyte Blastocyst Blastocyst Cleavage Stage Embryo Fertilised Egg Fertilised Egg